HEY Y'ALL! My name's Danelle, and TV Shows, movies, cartoons, books, comics, and video games have ruined, and are still ruining, my life. Also fighting the patriarchy with my boobs of justice is a hobby of mine. I am a writer and I enjoy critiquing and cosplaying shit. Loves You all! <3
Hey All You Lovelies Out There <3
My Critiques Cosplay My Life

pettyartist:

nickthemudkiptrainer:

thepagejakeenglish:

ingthing:

gaybabyincarcerationstation:

best of Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney

Legendary.

what was phoenix wright

oh my goodness these games 

And this is just the first game

elestiel:

GIVE ME A TITLE IN MY ASKBOX

  • QUEEN/KING OF _____???
  • PRINCESS/PRINCE OF _____???
  • EMPRESS/EMPEROR OF _____???

bonus points:

  • HEIR TO _____???
  • GOD/GODDESS OF _____???
  • OVERLORD OF _____???
  • GUARDIAN/PROTECTOR OF ____???
  • THE PATRON SAINT OF ____???
  • MASTER/MISTRESS OF ____???

samsangel:

Hello fellow nerds!

A new school year is approaching, and since I have to nail my A* this year I put together a masterpost with helpful links and tips that I have gathered throughout my school years. Good luck this year: you´ll do just fine!

1. Learn ´em languages
2. Do your research
3. Learn how to write like a God
4. Oh yes sweet reading
5. Get your studying and organization game on
6. Stress and anxiety management because school is stressful
7. Go get ´em tests
8. Classroom participation - because teachers love that shit
9. Software and pages for us nerdy kids
10. Yo! Take some time to care ´bout yo´self

"To obtain, something of equal value must be lost. That is alchemy's first law of equivalent exchange."

Aang deals with cultural appropriation - (x)

adventuretime:

iguanamouth:

recently i was approached by boom studios with an offer to do an ADVENTURE TIME COMIC COVER, and i jumped on the chance to be a part of a series that ive always enjoyed a whole dang lot

after submitting three potential designs we went with my personal favorite, the one with a big ol nod to m.c. escher. even if it doesnt get chosen as an official cover i still had a lot of fun with the design ! and id imagine if escher was still around to see it hed say something like “how did i get here” and “whats going on”. haha classic escher

M.C. Escher would love this if he were alive. He’d also be 116 years old.

taratiki17:

A few photos from the Secret Rose Boudoir tea party I attended~ It was my first tea party and my first lolita coord. I had an amazing time!
also here~

Dress: Innocent World
Blouse: Krad Lanrete
Head Dress: Handmade
Shoes: Offbrand
Tights/gloves: Taobao
Fan/Jewelry: Vintage

impressionist:

paradelle:

crossedwires:

niqaeli:

I admit, I don’t know Cho that well, so I am glad there are other readings to be had!

And if he is just calling it out simply because he’s tired of it and he feels comfortable doing so even on his own films now, I think that’s fantastic. There’s certainly plenty for him to be calling out.

Heh. Well, I don’t know John Cho either. But he has talked about race & representation before* (and not in a ‘we’re all human, it doesn’t matter’ way), so it’s not completely ‘out of character’ for him to bring it up. I think it probably would be easier on him if he didn’t say anything, but I’m glad he does.

*Re Harold & Kumar (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHEkLBZI1IM 4:07 mark): If you have a Korean and an Indian guy as your leads, you must address race at some point in the movie. You must, because the audience is noting it, really. The other thing is, I think, comedy at its best, treads in taboo waters a little bit. It has to have that transgressive quality to it, and race is the biggest taboo in America. I mean, people are very reluctant to talk about race and yet when you do jokes about race, uh, that work, people are very happy to release tension and laugh about it. But it has been interesting. I’ll make an observation. During the first tour for the first movie, we were talking about race all the time with journalists. It was almost like a process— looking back, the first movie was more concerned with race, but we talked about it so much, I felt that it was in a way…a way of justifying our presence in a motion picture.

And from an interview in 2009 http://www.asiaarts.ucla.edu/090703/article.asp?parentID=110145&gt:

JC: I recall from the Harold and Kumar movies is my struggle with the advertisers.

APA: What happened there?

JC: There was all this racial humor in the movie, and the advertising department wanted to say “Starring the Asian guy in American Pie, and the Indian guy from Van Wilder…” and they did go with that, and they submitted that to me for approval, and I said, “I don’t like it.” They asked me why, and I explain it to them, and that was tricky because it’s difficult explaining to my own representatives, why that didn’t jibe with me, because everyone kind of felt like it was keeping in tone with the movie. And I said, “I don’t like it. We’re poking fun at racism in the movie all the time, but it puts the audience on the wrong side of the racism joke.” So they were playing with the wording a little bit in the edits, and they kept coming up with versions to make me happy, but they were essentially the same thing, and I finally said, “you are not going to make me happy. You’re dancing around it, and you’re clearly attached to this idea, and I want you to know that no version of this idea will make me happy. And if you’re afraid that I won’t show up to do promotion because of this bitterness, you can rest assured that that’s not true. I consider promoting a movie part of my duties, and I will show up nevertheless. But you can either use this campaign and know that I’m unhappy, or you can change it and know that I’m happy. That’s it. Stop trying.” And eventually they went with it, and it’s one of those things where I look back and I’ve very proud of the movie, but that’s the thing I remember.

APA: Last question…for Harold and Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay, Viva La Union recorded a song for the soundtrack with the line, “I want my own Chinese baby” — what’s that about?

JC: When I was thinking about it, I thought of a literal baby. There’s a kind of lack that children fill, that’s just the dark side of being a parent, I think. And there’s an accessory quality to Chinese babies in America, and I just think it’s funny. I just liked it. And you know, I would know people who would fawn over Asian babies more, and it got me to thinking, there’s this belief that Asian babies are really cute, and it got me thinking that our whole race is infantilized to some degree, and it manifests itself in different ways. You infantilize a woman, and she becomes eroticized. You infantilize a man, and he becomes emasculated. You infantilize a baby [laughs] — and it’s possible, it appears that you can infantilize a baby even more. [laughs] The babies need to be cuter than white babies. And it’s just a weird thing that I felt like said something about mainstream America’s relationship to Asians in general. So that’s where it came from.

Also this interview: http://blog.angryasianman.com/2008/04/q-with-john-cho.html

“And yes, I do feel a responsibility, and always have, and it’s been an odd burden for me. Even when I started and no one gave a shit, I was trying to avoid doing roles—and it’s no accident that I’ve never done something with a chop suey accent. It’s no accident that I’ve never played those parts. I strongly believe there are a lot of Asian American actors who think that that’s the price to pay before you get to wherever you’re going. And I take real issue with that. Because you have to maintain integrity from the start, and on a personal level, you have to not do something that’s going to make you sick to your stomach.

But on a political level, how are things supposed to ever change if there’s someone willing to do it? I can tell you now, having worked in the business, that you can gather an army of people to hold picket signs and stand outside the studio, and say, “we destest this portrayal”… but it doesn’t matter if there’s a guy—who they know, a peer—who’s willing to do it, who stands in front of the crew and does the buck-tooth accent. If he or she is willing to do it, it makes the protestors look like extremists. It makes this guy look like the normal guy. Because we all work in the same industry. So the willingness of one actor negates a thousand protestors and a thousand angry letters.”

(So I can see why Butawhiteman Cantbekhan playing Khan would be deeply upsetting to him, even if Cho wasn’t in this movie.)

I love him 1000 times just for flawlessly articulating this racist absurdity in the most succinct and accurate way I’ve ever encountered.

john cho my hero

impulsivefarmer:

markscherz:

bookreada:

Can someone from the science side of Tumblr explain this?

Basically this argument uses a flawed understanding of (i) the process of evolution and (ii) the evolution of humans and other apes.

What you have to understand is that evolution does not mean that every individual of species A turns into species B over time, without any individuals of species A persisting - this is transmutation and, while it does occasionally happen, it is not the main mechanism of evolution. Rather, evolution works by gradual mutation and selection acting over time, such that species A at time 0 can give rise to species B at time N. It is possible for species B to arise from species A without species A having ever gone extinct - when this happens without any gene flow between the two populations, usually in some kind of geographic isolation, we call this ‘allopatric speciation’. It is equally possible for species A to give rise to species B and species C, while at the same time going extinct itself.

This means that if you trace lineages backward through time, they converge. Each convergence is the point where the two lineages have a common ancestor. The most recent common ancestor (mrca) of a set of lineages is the most recent point at which all lineages were the same species.

Chimps, Gorillas, and other apes, are not our ancestors. Rather, they are other lineages that diverged from a common ancestor of our group. That common ancestor was an ape, but it was not an ape that is still around today. 

I hope that helped. If you have more questions, don’t hesitate to ask.

Yours sciencerely,

Mark Scherz

On behalf of the Science Side of Tumblr.

This is such a common argument made by creationist. It makes me want to slam my face into a wall every time I see or hear it.

meruz:

sketches of younger!tenzin?? im trying to kind of differentiate him from drawing aang….somehow…

also ive been thinking: aang probably never had to rly stress abt propagating the single existing airbender line bc he’d been dating katara since they were basically preteens but for poor tenzin puberty must’ve been literal hell LMAO….

faitherinhicks:

leseanthomas:

OMFG. THIS. SHOW.

weirdly relevant to the question I answered yesterday.

Just repeat to yourself “This isn’t the Olympics, it’s an industry” and go make those comics!!!!!!!!!

littlebuttstar:

socktumbler:

drtanner:

OH NOOOOOOOOO

MAGIC IS REAL

Its a gift

Daily Show correspondent Michael Che tries to find a safe place to report from.

stunningpicture:

Creative kid. More creative mom.

But then, the truth was never really the point. Thin women don’t tell their fat friends ‘You’re not fat’ because they’re confused about the dictionary definition of the word, or their eyes are broken, or they were raised on planets where size 24 is the average for women. They don’t say it because it’s the truth. They say it because fat does not mean just fat in this culture. It can also mean any or all of the following:

Ugly
Unhealthy
Smelly
Lazy
Ignorant
Undisciplined
Unlovable
Burdensome
Embarrassing
Unfashionable
Mean
Angry
Socially inept
Just plain icky

So when they say ‘You’re not fat,’ what they really mean is ‘You’re not a dozen nasty things I associate with the word fat.’ The size of your body is not what’s in question; a tape measure or a mirror could solve that dispute. What’s in question is your goodness, your lovability, your intelligence, your kindness, your attractiveness. And your friends, not surprisingly, are inclined to believe you get high marks in all those categories. Ergo, you couldn’t possibly be fat.


Kate Harding (via rhiannon-random)

another example of thin privilege, your body type doesn’t carry these negative synonyms

(via fatcatsandcurls)

Boy howdy it sure is frustrating when I say “It’s hard for me to find cool clothes on the rack in sizes that fit me” and my very slim friends say “Oh shut up it is not” It’s like, Wow, that is fascinating, I had no idea you had more experience shopping for my body than I do! Like, all these negative terms are so intrinsically associated with heavyset bodies that my small friends tell me I’m wrong when I say it’s difficult shopping in trendy boutiques where 80% of the stuff on the racks in a size 4, because they get the idea that that pretending I have the ability to squeeze into tiny clothes for tiny people will make me feel better about myself.

(via coelasquid)